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For those of you who have spent years stretching “tight” hips and had no real improvements , you’re chasing the wrong rabbit down the wrong hole.

If the muscle is actually tight, it should be able to become less tight by stretching, and those gains should be permanent if they are appropriate to the restriction. The muscles are hanging on to give stability to some other part of the body, probably the lumbar spine.

The muscles of the hip that resist internal rotation are primarily found on the lateral aspect of the hip.

These muscles play a key role in providing lateral stability to the spine along with the obliques, psoas, serratus anterior and latissimus dorsi. This is where the side plank comes in. It can help to stimulate these muscles and force them to work together to help stabilize the spine in a position that doesn’t allow compensation, and therefore can re-set the hip and core to allow the hip to move properly. Throw a leg raise in there and you have some ultra-mega-power lateral stability.

The muscles that resist external rotation are primarily found on the medial and front of the hip, and have a high correlation to anterior core instability. This is where the front plank comes in. When done properly, the hip flexors are held in a stretched position while the rectus abdominis is working in conjunction with the obliques and glutes to provide the best pelvic and spinal stability possible.

A good front plank should make your glutes incredibly tired from forcibly making them contract so that your hip flexors stretch and the abs bite down harder.

As an example of these concepts during the workshop in Tusla, I had one volunteer who had a history of anterior abdominal issues ( Pilot Womens Flat Inca Detail Toe Post Jelly Sandals in Transparent Transparent 6nHJE
that resulted in a still-present diastasis recti , or a separation of the two sides of the six-pack muscle) and tested her hips.

She had full flexion through the Thomas test, had decent internal rotation, but had barely any external rotation. Normal means that holding the hip flexed to 90 degrees, the leg should be able to be brought across the body to be in line with the opposite hip, or 90 degrees external rotation. These are just rough numbers, but they tend to hold up well with a wide selection of people.

So she had really poor external rotation. Instead of giving her the littany of hip stretches that wouldn’t do anything to fix the problem, I had her do a front plank, getting really specific to make sure she was in a neutral spine, getting a hard glute contraction, and making sure she was taking full deep breaths. She held this for about 15 seconds, or 3 deep breaths, and then I re-tested her hips.

“Oh my GAAAAAAAAAHHD!!!!” I believe were the words out of her mouth when she now had full external rotation range of motion. Again, we didn’t do any “stretching,” but she improved her range of motion dramatically, so much so that in 15 seconds she saw a greater increase inhip mobility than she’d seen in 10 plus years by working on different stretches and common kinesiological approaches to tightness versus stiffness.

This study employs microsimulation techniques to provide an accounting of exposure to imprisoned or formerly imprisoned kin. We characterize the risk and prevalence of imprisonment within full kinship networks and find that the life course trajectories of familial imprisonment experienced by black and white Americans take on qualitatively distinct forms: the average black American born at the height of the prison boom experienced the imprisonment of a relative for the first time at age 7 and by age 65 belongs to a family in which more than 1 in 7 working-age relatives have ever been imprisoned. By contrast, the average white American who experiences the imprisonment of a relative does not do so until age 39 and by age 65 belongs to a family in which 1 in 20 working-age relatives have ever been imprisoned. Future reductions in imprisonment rates have the potential to meaningfully reduce these racial disparities in family imprisonment burden.

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This study employs microsimulation techniques to provide an accounting of exposure to imprisoned or formerly imprisoned kin. We characterize the risk and prevalence of imprisonment within full kinship networks and find that the life course trajectories of familial imprisonment experienced by black and white Americans take on qualitatively distinct forms: the average black American born at the height of the prison boom experienced the imprisonment of a relative for the first time at age 7 and by age 65 belongs to a family in which more than 1 in 7 working-age relatives have ever been imprisoned. By contrast, the average white American who experiences the imprisonment of a relative does not do so until age 39 and by age 65 belongs to a family in which 1 in 20 working-age relatives have ever been imprisoned. Future reductions in imprisonment rates have the potential to meaningfully reduce these racial disparities in family imprisonment burden.
Pil H. Chung : Departments of Sociology and Demography, University of California, Berkeley E-mail: pchung@berkeley.edu

Peter Hepburn : Departments of Sociology and Demography, University of California, Berkeley E-mail: pshepburn@demog.berkeley.edu

Acknowledgements: We gratefully acknowledge David Harding, Kristin Turney, Sandra Susan Smith, Daniel Schneider, Christopher Wildeman, Robert Pickett, and Elayne Oliphant for the invaluable advice and feedback they provided at various stages of this work.

Supplemental Material
By Parker Webservices on in Articles

Ethan Fosse, Christopher Winship

The intrinsic estimator (IE) has become a widely used tool for the analysis of age–period–cohort (APC) data in sociology, demography, and other fields. However, it has been recently recognized that the IE is a subtype of a larger class of estimators based on the Moore–Penrose generalized inverse (MP estimators) and that different estimators can lead to radically divergent estimates of the true, unknown APC effects. To clarify the differences and similarities of MP estimators, we introduce a canonical form of the linear constraints imposed on the true temporal effects. Using this canonical form, we compare the IE to related MP estimators, examining the conditions under which they recover the true temporal effects, the impact of the size and sign of nonlinearities on the estimated linear effects, and their sensitivity to the number of age, period, and cohort categories. We show that two MP estimators, which we call the difference estimator (DE) and the orthogonal estimator (OE), impose constraints that are both less sensitive and easier to interpret than those of the IE. We conclude with practical guidelines for researchers interested in using MP estimators to estimate temporal effects.

PDF (160 views)
The intrinsic estimator (IE) has become a widely used tool for the analysis of age–period–cohort (APC) data in sociology, demography, and other fields. However, it has been recently recognized that the IE is a subtype of a larger class of estimators based on the Moore–Penrose generalized inverse (MP estimators) and that different estimators can lead to radically divergent estimates of the true, unknown APC effects. To clarify the differences and similarities of MP estimators, we introduce a canonical form of the linear constraints imposed on the true temporal effects. Using this canonical form, we compare the IE to related MP estimators, examining the conditions under which they recover the true temporal effects, the impact of the size and sign of nonlinearities on the estimated linear effects, and their sensitivity to the number of age, period, and cohort categories. We show that two MP estimators, which we call the difference estimator (DE) and the orthogonal estimator (OE), impose constraints that are both less sensitive and easier to interpret than those of the IE. We conclude with practical guidelines for researchers interested in using MP estimators to estimate temporal effects.
Ethan Fosse : Department of Sociology, Princeton University E-mail: efosse@princeton.edu

Christopher Winship : Department of Sociology, Harvard University E-mail: cwinship@wjh.harvard.edu

By Parker Webservices on in Articles

Thomas Leopold, Jan Skopek, Florian Schulz

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